Beware of Predatory Pricing by Some Vendors of THE HALCYON DISLOCATION

I recently received a question from an interested customer who wanted to buy The Halcyon Dislocation as a Christmas gift, a question guaranteed to warm the heart of any author. When she checked on my Amazon author site, she saw the Kindle edition of The Halcyon Dislocation for $3.99, but at that time the only printed copy she saw was listed for $92.48 USD (I think the vendor promised shipping for only $3.99). Her question to me was “What gives here? Why is a $3.99 Kindle book listing for $92.48?” Great question. My books lists for $24.99 CAD (since I’m a Canadian author and the book is printed in Canada). I didn’t take a screen capture at the time, but here’s one from today:kazmaier-author-site-003

The Paperback price is somewhat lower today than before Christmas, but still almost four times the list price. What’s going on and how does one get at least the list price (vendors like Amazon sometimes have sales prices which are much better than the list).

If one clicks on the Kindle edition then …

thd-e-book-002

After clicking on the Kindle Version

Only now do you see the much more reasonable list price of $24.99. So where did these $80-$90 prices come from? I contacted my publisher, Word Alive Press and their representative did not know. The simple answer appears to be that there are vendors who can list at any price they choose and somehow their offerings can appear very high up in the on-line listing. When I discussed this on my author site on Goodreads, I was contacted by another author who speculated that for relatively rare books (I didn’t think of The Halcyon Dislocation as a rare book), there are vendors who attempt to sell books at inflated prices and if they get a hit they simply buy a copy at the list price and take home a tidy profit with no inventory. In the case of my author colleague, his textbook which lists for $79.95 was offered for $450. His theory may be correct. if one clicks on the expensive version and then on the box “see all buying options” :

other-buying-options

Then one can pull up a list of vendors that offer to sell The Halcyon Dislocation listed in order of decreasing price:

vendors

As an author who is trying to make a name for himself, I wish I could offer a 326 page trade paperback like The Halcyon Dislocation for much less than $24.99 (as I do with the Kindle edition at $3.99) however with Print-On-Demand costs that is not really feasible. However, to me, charging $80 or $90 dollars for a book that with one click would let the reader buy it for $25 is predatory, and takes advantage of a customer’s inexperience with internet sales.

THE HALCYON DISLOCATION featured on Kay MacLeod’s Indie Advent Calendar

THD-2_Front_PageMy novel The Halcyon Dislocation was featured on December 19th on Kay MacLeod’s Indie Advent Calendar. Why not check it out?

Wishing You a Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

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Merry Christmas and a blessed New Year to family, friends, and readers. What’s behind this picture of a bridge over a castle dry moat? Find out what’s new with author Peter Kazmaier and his writing.

Check Out Featured Indie Authors at Kay MacLeod’s Author Advent Calendar

advent-calendar-indieFantasy author, Kay MacLeod had a wonderful idea—why not set up an online advent calendar that features Indie authors from many different genres?

It starts today. Why not check it out?

Review of Jean Chamberlain-Froese and Patricia Paddey’s GAME CHANGERS

Here is my review recently published on Goodreads:

The Game Changers: True Stories About Saving Mothers & Babies In East AfricaThe Game Changers: True Stories About Saving Mothers & Babies In East Africa by Dr. Jean Chamberlain Froese

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Game Changers is a powerful and moving book that gives a snapshot of the lives of key leaders, healthcare workers, and teachers in Uganda as they struggle to solve the huge problem mother-and-child deaths during pregnancy and delivery. Through the lives of front line workers, Dr. Jean Chamberlain-Froese (the founder of Save The Mothers) and Patricia Paddey (a journalist) provide heart-wrenching accounts of the magnitude of the problem as well as a look at the courageous men and women that are working to solve it in East Africa.

This book will move you and also give you a sense of hope as you see the commitment of these Ugandans, see how their deep faith moves them to action, and marvel at the progress that has already been made. It will also leave you (as it did me) with a profound sense of gratitude that we are not forced to go through the same trials here. The Gamer Changers is worth reading several times and can also be picked up and read in short sittings. I highly recommend it.
View all my reviews

On Steven Erikson’s Preface to GARDENS OF THE MOON

gardens-of-the-moon-coverI’ve just started reading Steven Erikson’s Gardens of the Moon (Steven Erikson is the pseudonym of Steve Rune Lundin). My edition has a preface by Erikson telling a little bit about how the story came about.

As an author, its always interesting and instructive to read other people’s descriptions of how their stories took shape. One quote in particular caught my eye and got me thinking. Erikson was explaining why his book took a long time to get published and he mentioned how “Gardens marked a departure from the usual tropes of the genre [fantasy]”, and he went on to say that his work followed in the footsteps of Glen Cook …

“I could certainly strive for the same tone of dispirited, wry cynicism, the same ambivalence and a similar sense of atmosphere [in Cook’s books]. Maybe I was aware of the swing away from Good versus Evil, but that just seemed a by-product of growing up—the real world’s not like that, why persist in making Fantasy worlds so fundamentally disconnected with reality?”

Now I haven’t read Glen Cook’s books and I must say reading a story with a “tone of dispirited, wry cynicism” is not a comment on a book’s back cover that would move me to rush to acquire it. But is Erikson right? Is the sense of a battle between Good and Evil that’s so central to The Lord of the Rings “fundamentally disconnected with reality” as Erikson states?

I don’t think he is right. First of all, the nature of reality is not a settled question, otherwise we would all agree on it’s exact nature. Now what I believe Mr. Erikson is saying that in his understanding of the nature of reality, Good versus Evil is a view that he discarded as he grew older.

As a theist and a Christ-follower my convictions about the reality of a cosmic battle between Good and Evil have only grown stronger as I have grown older. I live with great hope. It’s not that I don’t see the pain and suffering around me (indeed Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings had a great deal of loss, pain, and suffering) but I believe we are somewhere in the middle of our story, and so we feel like the defenders in the last desperate hours of the siege of Minas Tirith or Frodo and Sam felt as they set out on the last impossible attempt to the Cracks of Doom. But its not the end of the story. There is an ending coming where Good triumphs over evil. Those are my convictions about reality which give me great optimism. Given my view of the nature of reality it seems to me it makes good sense to write stories that have exactly those story lines.

Steven Erikson’s book has already given me much to think about. I expect to have more to contemplate as I progress through the story.

I’d be grateful if you checked out my books at Amazon.

Review of SKY GHOSTS: THE NIGHT BEFORE

Sky Ghosts: The Night Before (Sky Ghosts #0.5)Sky Ghosts: The Night Before by Alexandra Engellmann
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sky Ghosts are superhuman freedom fighters that clandestinely fight renegades of their kind (beasts) in order to protect the innocents, that is the rest of us, from the beast’s depredations. Sky Ghosts: The Night Before, like the sequel is filled with non-stop action, martial arts and blade combat interspersed with gallows humor. I enjoy that and I find Alexandra Engellmann handles the action scenes very well.

This novella (my e-book was 40 pages) is easy to read at one sitting and will let you know if you want to go on to the much more substantial Sky Ghosts: All for One.

As I understand it, from Alexandra Engellmann’s biography, english is not her first language. I would not know that from the quality of the writing. Indeed, I had a few complaints about word construction and unexpected point of view changes in my review of Sky Ghosts: All for One, but I find these little grammatical intrusions have disappeared in this later work.

A word of caution: I enjoy stories with lots of action. This one has a  lot of “hacking and hewing” mainly of beasts. At times the language is also quite strong.

View all my reviews

Review of SKY GHOSTS: ALL FOR ONE

Sky Ghosts: All for One (Sky Ghosts, #1)Sky Ghosts: All for One by Alexandra Engellmann
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Sky Ghosts: All for One is a fast-paced, action-filled fantasy that kept me engaged from the beginning to the end. The beings, Sky Ghosts, are a faction of super humans (they can fly, have extraordinary strength, and can heal themselves of injury) that at night battle their evil counterparts (Beasts), led by a corrupted, but very powerful former Sky Ghost called Eugene.

The story begins with a fortuitous rescue of two regular humans (Chad and Dave) by Sky Ghosts Jane and Pain (Patricia) in New York City. As the story unfolds, Dave and Chad have an interest to Eugene that causes him to do his best to kill them. Their protection and ultimate significance to the Sky Ghost cause is the enduring theme of the story.

My rating of three stars means that I liked the story a lot, but would not read it a second time. This really should have been a four star story (meaning I would come back to read it over and over again). However, the author often changes point of view within a scene so, as a reader, I’m surprised suddenly to find myself in different character’s head. There are also grammatical imperfections and sometimes the wrong word is used.

Having said that, I found this story contained a wonderful, exciting plot, with characters I found interesting and that I cared about. If you like fast-paced, plot-driven fantasy with strong female leads, I think you would enjoy this book.

A word of caution: I enjoy stories with lots of action. This one has a  lot of “hacking and hewing” mainly of beasts. At times the language is also quite strong.
View all my reviews at Goodreads

In Case You Didn’t Get My Newsletter …

A short summary of what the Kazmaiers have been up to and what’s happening with Peter’s writing. To see Peter’s author page at Amazon check http://goo.gl/k4e420.
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A significant milestone in Peter’s writing:

THE BATTLE FOR HALCYON was the 2016 winner at the 28th Word Awards in the Speculative Fiction category

As one attendee at the Word Award Gala in Toronto quipped: “Speculative Fiction? I thought all fiction was speculative.” That’s true, of course, but some fiction is more speculative than others. Speculative Fiction is an umbrella term that covers Science Fiction and Fantasy genres. Winning that particular award is especially gratifying to me since my writing in some respects has a foot in both genres.

On the one hand, my interest in science means that I work pretty hard to come up with plausible explanations for some of the imaginings in my new world. Plausible explanations are a signature of Science Fiction.

On the other hand I find the Materialist worldview implicit in most Science Fiction implausible and I’m much more at home in the philosophical landscape of Fantasy such as Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, where Good and Evil have real meaning and are fundamentals of existence (as opposed to inventions by people). From that perspective I think my books read much more like Fantasy.

So I was delighted to receive the 2016 Word Award for Speculative Fiction for my third book, The Battle for Halcyon. If you’d like to read more … http://wp.me/p4cZo4-6c

This newsletter is my chance to re-connect with my friends. If you have a moment, I would love to hear from you.

Writing at the Cottage

I find that our time at the cottage encourages me to write. The beautiful scenery and the wonderful birds are very inspiring. Here are a few pictures from our time at the cottage so far.

What is a cottage in Ontario without loons? This one along with its mate were cavorting in our bay.
The beautiful Pileated Woodpecker can be found around our cottage. This large bird is quite shy and it has been hard for me to get a good photograph.
Dragon flies are beautiful and help keep mosquitoes down.
Copyright © 2016 Wolfsburg Imprints, All rights reserved.
Many of you have been asking me how my writing has been progressing and I wanted to provide you with an update.Our mailing address is:

Wolfsburg Imprints

2421 Council Ring Road, Mississauga, ON, Canada

Mississauga, ON L5L 1E5

Canada

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THE BATTLE FOR HALCYON Wins at the 28th Annual Word Awards

My third book, The Battle for Halcyon, won the 2016 Word Novel Award: Speculative Fiction category. This is a major milestone for me since it is my first award as a novelist. Here are a few pictures from the award ceremony and the award itself.

28th Word Awards - Voice

“Every Writer a Voice” at the Word Awards (Photo by: Stephen Gurie Woo)

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2016 Word Award Certificate and Award

THE BATTLE FOR HALCYON Winner in the Speculative Fiction category (Photo by: Stephen Gurie Woo)


2016 Word Award - Peter

A milestone moment for me (Photo by: Stephen Gurie Woo)



Provoking An Attitude of Gratitude

Reflection on this award really brings me to remember the many friends who have helped to make this possible; this reflection cannot help but provoke an attitude of gratitude. Special thanks to The Word Guild and The Christian Herald for sponsoring The Speculative Fiction Award. Here are a few who have helped me so much with The Battle for Halcyon:

  • My editors Stephanie Paddey and Patricia Paddey. Thank you for improving the manuscript so significantly. It is such an encouragement to a writer to know that one’s editors are not simply professionally improving the grammar and sentence structure of the text, but that they care about the work and want to make it as good as it can be. Thank you.
  • For my beta readers who read the whole manuscript through and made many helpful suggestions. My friend John Greenhorn spent many hours going over every sentence meticulously and helped clarify the fuzzy parts. There were also many others (in alphabetical order—please forgive (and correct) me if I forgot anyone: Mark Jokinen, Darren Kazmaier, Mike Kazmaier, Phil Kazmaier, and Doug Paddey. Thank you.
  • Our monthly writer’s group at Don and Gloria Martin’s house. Thank you for listening to me read a few pages and then helping me to make them better.
  • To my readers who have contacted me end encouraged me with your feedback. Thank you.

Finally, I want to thank my wife Kathy. Her encouragement and support of my writing continue to mean so much to me. Without her partnership none of my novels would have been written.

I am cognisant that the finished novel, after much labour contains many defects and shortcomings. Still the good that I have been able to achieve through my writing has its origin and motivation in the Lord Christ and for that I am thankful and grateful.